Plagiarism


WHAT IS PLAGIARISM?
The use of another person’s words or ideas without stating where they came from is plagiarism.

WHY BE CONCERNED?
  • It is dishonest
  • It is unfair to you and others
  • It is illegal under the Copyright Act 1968

EXAMPLES OF PLAGIARISM
Deliberate plagiarism -
  • Buying or stealing an essay or response
  • Hiring someone to write your report or assignment
  • Copying from any source without citing it
Accidental plagiarism -
  • Using someone’s idea without reference to that person
  • Using “notes” which are actually “quotes”

AVOIDING PLAGIARISM
Always cite the following sources of information:
  • Internet: web, email groups
  • Pamphlets
  • Advertisements
  • Personal interview
  • Quotations
  • CD ROMs
  • Books
  • Music
  • Teachers / lecturers
  • Paraphrases, summaries
  • Magazines / newspapers
  • Letters
  • TV programs / films
  • Maps
  • Other students’ work
  • Other’s ideas
No need to cite:
  • Own experiences
  • When using common knowledge
  • Own experimental ideas

FINISHED PRODUCT FREE OF PLAGIARISM
Use your notes to -
  • Write your own thoughts and ideas
  • Develop a line of argument or an approach to a task
  • Construct a plan for your response
  • Write a rough draft edit and proof read
  • List all sources in the bibliography
  • Include acknowledgement of direct quotes in the body of the text or in footnotes
  • Include acknowledgements of ideas in the text e.g. “Jones (2003) suggests...”

The consequences for plagiarism are detailed on page 12 of your college diary.